VEUVE CLICQUOT BUSINESS WOMAN AWARD (UK) 2012 SHORTLIST IS ANNOUNCED

Veuve Clicquot has announced this week it’s shortlist for “Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award” at the WIE (Women: Inspiration & Enterprise) Power Breakfast at The London Stock Exchange, and the three finalists are:

  • Anya Hindmarch: Founder, Anya Hindmarch
  • Helena Morrissey: CEO, Newton Investment Management
  • Ruth Rogers: Chef & Owner, The River Café

The Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award is regarded as the ‘Oscars’ of female entrepreneurs and business leaders, and is now in its 40th year.  It celebrates entrepreneurial women who have made a significant contribution to business life in the UK. The nomination criteria are those ideals epitomised by Madame Clicquot: Entrepreneurship, financial success, Corporate Social Responsibility and acting as a role model.

All Finalists selected by the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award judging panel demonstrated the strongest evidence of all nomination criteria. Notable achievements included Helena Morrissey’s groundbreaking 30% Club, which helps champion the issue of women on boards, Anya Hindmarch’s entrepreneurial story and global pioneering of her ‘I am not a plastic bag’ initiative which raised the issue of plastic bag usage amongst the public’s consciousness as well as the government’s agenda, and Ruth Rogers’ steady growing business, changing how we perceive, as well as cook, Italian cuisine.

Carolyn McCall, a previous winner of the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award and current Panel member, noted: “The nominees for this year’s award are all great role models and have all the attributes that Veuve Clicquot looks for in its Business Woman Award. This award has played a vital role in recognizing and celebrating women in business.”

Sian Westerman, MD of Rothschild and member of the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award Panel commented: “This strong shortlist, drawn from an excellent long list, exemplifies what women can achieve in business: strong entrepreneurship and leadership, combined with a desire and ability to deliver real change in society. Spanning areas key to the UK economy of fashion, finance and hospitality, they are great role models for all who aspire to succeed in business.”

Jasmine Whitbread, CEO of Save the Children International and member of the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award Panel said: “It was inspiring to see the sheer quality and range of candidates for the award — busting the myth that there aren’t many women business leaders!”

The Award’s 20-strong judging panel is comprised of business leaders, including Carolyn McCall, Chief Executive, easyJet, Jasmine Whitbread, CEO Save the Children, Duncan Bannatyne, Entrepreneur and Dragon, Caroline Michel, CEO, Peters, Frasers and Dunlop as well as Sian Westerman, MD, Rothschild and other key industry experts.

The winner of the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award will be announced at a high-profile Champagne reception at The Ballroom at Claridge’s, London on the 18th of April 2012 at 6.30pm.

Christina Jesaitis, Senior Brand Manager, Veuve Clicquot said: “As we reach our 40th year of the award, social and environmental responsibility are still a key focus for our judges and this year’s finalists all represent business women that have embedded these important attributes into their organizations. The award also looks for those women that are able to act as more than just an example of a successful business woman, but rather an inspiration and mentor for future female entrepreneurs; we believe that all of our three finalists have demonstrated this quality.”

 

Liz Palmer
@champagnehouses

8 Wine Trends To Watch in 2012 by Liz Palmer

Since the plunge in world markets, the wine market has not only bounced back, but is on a steady uphill rise. The market in fine wines has become reliable and with such potential for growth that no respectable financial portfolio should be without a select stock of first growth Bordeaux. Along with an increased awareness of fine wines for investment purposes, here are some further trends that seem to be gaining strength:

1.      Local Wines – The movement to reduce carbon emissions and consume locally grown products has extended to the wine industry in the past few years and this will continue to grow.

2.      Less is More – New world wines with overripe grapes and high alcohol contents have lost their popularity and will be replaced by classic, elegant wines with less alcohol levels (below 13 or 14%). This style marks the return to the tradition of flavorful, balanced wines. There will also be less wood flavors with more clear fruit forward wines.

3.      Retailers Resurgent – Employees have never been more knowledgeable and have become less snobby.  There will be more in-store tastings with a culture of service becoming more important.

4.      Burgundy is the New Bordeaux – As prices for Bordeaux continue to rise, more wine lovers are choosing wines from Burgundy. This is evidenced at some recent New York and Hong Kong wine auctions.

 5.   Sustainable Wines – The desire to make more natural wines, from organic or biodynamic vineyards with minimal intervention, including the addition of chemicals, is gaining more recognition.

New Zealand is set on becoming the first country with a fully sustainable wine industry by 2013, with many of the country’s big winemakers already producing organic wines. Expect this trend to continue growing in the coming years.

6.  Value – Although we seem to be out of the worst of the recession, we are looking for good mid-priced wines that offer great value for the price. Wines from the regions of South America, Australia, and Spain offer such value without the high price tag.

7.    Bends –  There is some truth to the power of blending to build better wine.  This is true for both whites and reds. It is worth watching the renewed market power of non-varietal wines. The average consumer is more willing to buy wine without it being marked chardonnay or merlot – this is a crucial shift.  We’ve transcended our neuroses about blended wines — insecurities that grew out of pre-1980s fondness for things like hearty burgundy. It also means that we won’t be intimidated to try wines from elsewhere in the world that doesn’t proclaim varietal identity on the label.

8.    Artisan Wine – Artisan wine trend gains momentum on either continent. You will find more of these wines on the shelf and wine lists.  This trend shows no signs of slowing down.

 

Liz Palmer
@Champagnehouses

 

 

 

Wine Trends To Watch in 2012 – Part 1

As we enter 2012 with unsteady markets, it seems appropriate to make a guess at what the wine trends will be and what wines we should be looking for.  After some initial research, I have spotted some common wine trends:

1.      Local Wines – The movement to reduce carbon emissions and consume locally grown products has extended to the wine industry in the past few years and this will continue to grow.

2.      Less is More – New world wines with overripe grapes and high alcohol contents have lost their popularity and will be replaced by classic, elegant wines with less alcohol levels (below 13 or 14%). This style marks the return to the tradition of flavorful, balanced wines. There will also be less wood flavors with more clear fruit forward wines.

3.      Retailers Resurgent – Employees have never been more knowledgeable and have become less snobby.  There will be more in-store tastings with a culture of service becoming more important.

4.      Burgundy is the New Bordeaux – As prices for Bordeaux continue to rise, more wine lovers are choosing wines from Burgundy. This is evidenced at some recent New York and Hong Kong wine auctions.

Liz Palmer
@ChampagneHouses